Ronny & Lonny

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We’re so excited for our friend Ron Marvin who has a great feature on his work in the brand-new online magazine Lonny. The magazine looks lovely — it was started by two Domino Magazine alumni — and is full of fabulous products and interior design. One very cool feature afforded by the digital format is that you can hover over a product within an article and click on a link to its retailer. Some of our other faves featured in this issue are Grace Bonney of Design*Sponge and Eddie Ross (who was on Bravo’s Top Design). We definitely recommend checking it out.

Here’s what the editors of Lonny have to say:

In a time when shelter publications are turning their last pages…

OUR MISSION is to reopen the doors of accessible design. By embracing an online platform we provide inspiration at the click of a finger, directly connecting our readers to their favorite products and resources. Our freedom from page limits means that we can share more content in each issue, delivering an intimate look into the way people really live.
At Lonny, we value independent thinking and believe not in following trends but rather in making choices that lead to happiness. We believe that good design and affordable design can coexist and that true inspiration can be found in the teeniest of homes or in the grandest of spaces.

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R.I.P. Pushing Daisies

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So, Pushing Daisies is finished, with little hope of rising from the dead. ABC finally aired the final three episode, with the finale airing this past Saturday. It was truly a magical show, with production design outpacing anything else on network television. In case you never watched it, here’s my take on the ingredients that went into its amazing potion:

Characters and plot like Lemony Snicket (cartoonish, punny, clever, full of secrets and back story) involving illusionists, half-brothers, beekeepers, aquatic shoes, pop-up enthusiasts, window dressers, secret recipes, rival Norwegian gumshoe gangs, and so forth.

Sets like Tim Burton (think saturation and wonder like Charlie & the Chocolate Factory, or the dollhouse artifice of the suburbs in Edward Scissorhands) overflowing with detail and color

Shots like Wes Anderson (characters centered in frame with lots of details, fast zoom-ins and so forth)

Narration from the guy who reads the Harry Potter audiobooks; impromptu musical numbers once every five or six episodes (with the actress who starred in Wicked as the singer); Guest stars from A Mighty Wind and all sorts of other good stuff

Dialogue delivery like Gilmore Girls (fast-paced like old gumshoe movies, or more accurately like The Middleman, but no one watched that)

Costumes like uh, frickin’ magic. I can’t think of anything else that has costumes like this show. So amazing.

Ten more brilliant and dearly missed costumes/sets/shots after the jump.

Continue reading R.I.P. Pushing Daisies

BLVR RDR: First Issue

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VOL 1, ISSUE 1 March 2003

THIS IS THE FIRST BLVR RDR ISSUE REVIEW, WILL IT REALLY BE THE LAST:
Yes. No. It’s complicated.
Lots more after the jump.

Continue reading BLVR RDR: First Issue

Gertrude & Mabel

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As long as we are giving shouts out to wedding photographers, I feel I must mention the wonderful photographers at Gertrude & Mabel Photography who shot Owen’s and my wedding a few years ago.

Not only do Heidi and Judy take fantastic and artistic candid shots, they are also total pros at making portraits not look super posed.

I’ll try to add a few of their shots from our wedding, but for now the shots above are all from Gertrude & Mabel Photography’s site. All images are ©Gertrude & Mabel.

UPPERCASE Magazine

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I was so excited to receive my copy of UPPERCASE Magazine (a brand-new quarterly magazine published by Uppercase Gallery in Calgary) in the mail last week. I haven’t been able to read it super thoroughly yet, but from my few cursory looks, it is fantastic. I was a little nervous about subscribing without ever seeing it, but went ahead because the UPPERCASE blog is so well curated. So far, I have not been disappointed. Definitely check it out if you can — the magazine is available at a few retailers and, of course, at UPPERCASE.

The cover illustration is by Madrid-based artist Blanca Gómez; her work is available for purchase at her site and at her etsy shop. The lovely script on the lower-left corner of the cover is Mary Read (which Owen discussed in last week’s Font-y Friday).

TypograFriday: “Unchanged since 2002. Now completely new.”

In case this is the font-iest of blogs you read, let me be the first to break it to you that Typographica is back! Their opening salvo, a return of the “Oscars of type Design,” their Favorite Typefaces of the year feature (see also 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 entries), is terrific and their new layout marvelous.

This is one of a handful of blogs that were in my very first blog bookmarks folder, that inspired me since waaaay back in the day. I know I teased them for not updating (and url vagaries) in my eulogy of SpeakUp and now I feel like crap about it. But as Stephen Coles writes in his very read-worthy note about the relaunch [please note that his links in this passage constitute the A-list of type blogs/forums today! Bookmark'm!]

It wasn’t just that our attention was diverted — other type bloggers took the reins and did it better, more beautifully and comprehensively, with more brains, more fervor, and more expertise. And, of course, there’s really no reason to go anywhere else to discuss type with knowledgeable peers than Typophile.

The new typographica, then, is not trying to compete with its supercharged grandchildren as another type blog, but as a “vehicle for typeface recommendations and reviews.” I couldn’t be more excited. Four of our favorites from this year’s favorites list (other than Archer that we already established is next on our must-have list!) … after the jump.

Continue reading TypograFriday: “Unchanged since 2002. Now completely new.”

We’re past this now.

So the New York Times Magazine this week was The Green Issue. The articles are pretty good, and they’re online with what looks like a lot of other media. I am excited for instance about electric cars that swap batteries rather than refuel. The weekly profile is on Stewart Brand (Whole Earth Catalog, WELL, Clock of the Long Now), who is fascinating and inspiring. But here’s my gripe: Windsor?
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For this issue, the magazine’s feature headlines are all set in this most un-current of types. I know that I am a type geek, but I bet you can see it too this time: these bulbous, deco-a-go-go letters signify the past as surely as tie-dyes with bell-bottoms. Look at the characters “2009″: it looks frickin’ ludicrous to see our current date clothed in this type. It looked old-fashioned the first time Woody Allen used it (he favors the condensed cut) and it’s only gotten more willfully apart-from-the-times in the dozen times he’s kept using it since. (It looked old-fashioned even in the 1970s; like so much of the vernacular type of the day it was stolen from the art movements from half a century ealier.)

The rationale seems to be because it was used for the Whole Earth Catalog, but that doesn’t fly with me. This indicates to me the reader that environmentalism is best thought of as a phase from the 70s. If you’re going to report on the state of the world right now, NYTM, please please don’t use the vernacular type of yesteryear. In fact unless you want to evoke the 70s best to just keep your ITC locked away.

Ok, rant over.

The Substance of Style

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My favorite movie is The Royal Tenenbaums. In fact I love director Wes Anderson in general; his overarching and meticulous vision and distinct sensibility makes for unique — and to me, near-perfect — films. I was delighted, therefore, to find a five-part, in-depth, thoughtful and well-researched video essay on his influences. I want more things like this in my life, please.

Part 1: Charles Schultz (Peanuts), Orson Welles (The Magnificent Ambersons), François Truffaut (The 400 Blows)

Part 2: Martin Scorsese (GoodFellas), Richard Lester (The Beatles’ Help!), and Mike Nichols (The Graduate)

Part 3: Hal Ashby (Harold and Maude)

Part 4: J.D. Salinger (The Catcher in the Rye)

Part 5: opening of The Royal Tenenbaums — my favorite sequence of my favorite movie — annotated Pop-Up Video style with influences and Anderson’s own innovations.

Both where this is housed, the Museum of the Moving Image, and the author’s (Matt Zoller Seitz) blog The House Next Door are intriguing too, especially for people like me who like thinking ad nauseum about films.

via metafilter

Print Liberation

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I ordered the book Print Liberation for Owen for Christmas, but it sold out everywhere before it arrived. The book finally got here today, and I am super excited. I’ve been wanting us to get back into traditional screenprinting (instead of just gocco) for a while now and I think this book might give us the push we need.

BLVR RDR Zeroeth Issue

I commute on MUNI, BART and CalTrain 5 days, roughly 13 hours a week.

I’m not complaining; in some ways it’s awesome. For instance, reading time has been restored to my life in spades. In the last few months I read some good novels, tried to read the most annoyingly terrible book ever to have been called genius, read not as much nonfiction as I should have, and found myself regularly looking over the shelves with to figure out my next read.

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Aha!

Continue reading BLVR RDR Zeroeth Issue

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