New Oliver Sacks covers

I love these new Oliver Sacks book covers (due out in August) from Vintage, designed by Cardon Webb. Interestingly, Cardon posted them on Dribbble a few months ago, saying they’d been killed. I’m glad someone realized how great they are and gave them the green light.

via Spine Out

Typografriday: Handwriting, Helvetica and Humans.

Last weekend we saw the new Mike Mills film Beginners. Afterward I said it was my favorite movie of the new decade, and I have yet to take that back. Its got incredible heart, innovative pacing, a fantastic script, and an admirable sense of authenticity. But enough about the film. Do we look like a movie review blog? Just go see it: let’s talk type.

Beginners with its beautifully awkward brushy cursive (shades of Interview masthead and Quiksilver logo but far more humble/charming than both) belongs squarely to the last grouping I mentioned in my analysis of handwriting-on-movie-poster trending — that is, it is typecast with the painfully earnest Freaks and Geeks, Beautiful Losers (which he’s featured in along with handletterer Geoff McFettridge) and Where the Wild Things Are (by fellow Beastie Boys collaborator Spike Jonze and fellow enthusiast for the authentic Dave Eggers). His previous feature film Thumbsucker also falls into this category, as does Me You and Everyone We Know (the first feature film of his wife, artist Miranda July). Indeed, though not movies, so does her book of stories or his great series of products, “Humans.” These are all linked by a raw earnestness signalled by their use of handlettering.

So, wait. I know handwriting and that… some of that is not handwriting, it’s Helvetica. The more I look at Mike Mills’ work (of art rather than design for clients) the more it seems he has two modes: handwriting and Helvetica. And I’m generally not a fan of the font without qualities, but with his content in it, I’m a bit in love. Words from the heart makes sense in scrawled lettering, but it’s a bit obvious. Text about the human experience, or sadness, in the typeface of generics and megacorps is sort of beautiful.

For much more Mike Mills, visit his site. I recommend watching his short film Deformer — though the preview on his site is only a minute of its 17-min run time. If you live by me, I’ll lend you the issue of the Believer it’s in.

Tattly

Oddly, the Experts are a surprisingly tattoo-free group. Thankfully, Tina Roth Eisenberg (AKA swissmiss) has come to the rescue for those times when you just want a little design-y body art. Inspired by the lack of cool temporary tattoos for her daughter, swissmiss contacted a number of designers to see if they liked her idea for Tattly and to see if they would be interested in submitting designs. Some pretty awesome designers have contributed so far, though unsurprisingly, my two favorites are Frank Chimero’s Knucks and Jessica Hische’s Type Nerd (though I kind of love them all). For the first 2 weeks, you can get the whole set for $35.


via swissmiss

Brioche!

Posting has been a bit light over here at The Experts; we’ve been traveling and working tons. But thanks to our pal Jesse Ragan, we can break our dry-spell. Through him we learned of Jessica Hische‘s lovely new font Brioche which she designed for his Type@Cooper class. It looks like a pretty fun face and I think she is right, it would be great for weddings. You can purchase it through Jessica’s site.

Become Someone Else


We don’t post a ton of advertising stuff, but I thought these “Become Someone Else” print ads for Mint Vinetu by Love warranted a mention. What’s not to like about ads that promote reading? Plus, they are really well done — the images are such a quick read that without even being able to read the copy, you totally get the meaning. Here is what Love had to say about the project:

When one reads books, he/she starts living it and identifies (or not) with main hero. These print ads for the Mint Vinetu bookstore, which sells lots of classics, focuses on the idea of becoming someone else. And provokes people to try on different personas.

Via Black Eiffel

Maria Fischer — Traumgedanken


I am sort of in love with Maria Fischer‘s Traumgedanken (Thoughts on Dreams). It combines so many things that I love: embroidery (or at least thread), artist’s books, using design to add meaning. I feel like I would need to see this book to fully understand all the levels of connectivity, but what I understand based on these photos is that this book is beautiful.

Here is what Maria has to say about her book:

The book “Traumgedanken” (“Thoughts on dreams”) contains a collection of literary, philosophical, psychological and scientifical texts which provide an insight into different dream theories.

To ease the access to the elusive topic, the book is designed as a model of a dream about dreaming. Analogue to a dream, where pieces of reality are assembled to build a story, it brings different text excerpts together. They are connected by threads which tie in with certain key words. The threads visualise the confusion and fragileness of dreams.

On five pages there are illustrations made out of thread. Their shape and colour relies on the key words on the opposite page. This way an abstract image of the dream about dreaming is generated.

In addition there are five pages where a significant excerpt from a text of the opposite page is stitched into the paper. It is not legible because the type’s actual surface is inside the folded page. This expresses the mysteriousness of dreams and the aspect of dream interpretation.







Many thanks to Jason for sending this our way!

Tree of Codes, Part 3: The Making of

I realize that by posting this video, we may cross the line from being Tree of Codes enthusiasts to being Tree of Codes stalkers, but, so be it. Tree of Codes is awesome, die-cutting is awesome, printing is awesome and this video does a great job of showing just how awesome they all are.

Etsy Schmetsy: Totes Specific

This week’s schmetsy is a little bit more narrow in focus than usual: tote bags. No, no, black-and-white tote bags. Wait, design-geeky black-and-white tote bags! This one runs the gamut, from letterforms to parts of letterforms to Thai letterforms, parallel lines to Bauhaus shapes. Enjoy!



Row 1: Serif Tote Bag from TheLittleFactory; Screen print Tote Bag – White ampersand from  PiccoloNegozio; Thai Alphabet Tote Bag from studiowonjun
Row 2: feel like helvetica tote from afavorite; TOTE / lines from PAWLING; Design Shopping Tote Bag from Marideestudio
Row 3: ABC ETC. hand silk screened tote from  trulyloved; Bauhaus Block Canvas Tote Bag from mediumcontrol; a shadowy alphabet in a tote bag from cuadrado

TypograFriday: Live the Language

The first time I went to Europe, I went on an EF tour — plus, I have travel on my mind right now — so these videos are right up my alley. They are lovely and educational, but what makes the Live the Language series extra special is the fantastic regionally-appropriate typography, done by Albin Holmqvist. I hope they add one for Rome — I’m trying to learn Italian, and I love any opportunity to see Italy.




Flickr Mondays-Senior Project Time!

Happy Monday! Thought I’d give you all a sneak peak into my newest project–I’m mentoring a coworkers daughter with her senior project–a magazine focusing on real people–her friends. Here are some of my favorite pictures from our first photoshoot (most shots taken at the Lafayette Reservoir in the East Bay). Enjoy!

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