Etsy Schmetsy: Stay Gold, Ponyboy.

There’s something about gold. I’m not sure if it’s the brightness of the color, the sheen of the metal, or the cheer that either brings. For this week’s Schmetsy, we give a shout out to all things golden.




Row 1: Good Boy Golden Ring by Fleathers; Tea for One Print by yumiyumi; Golden Urban Set of 5 Rings by AurumJewelry

Row 2: Early Golden Bantam Heirloom Organic Corn Seed by Thebearfootshaman; Buddy Holly Print by modernanthem; Upcycled Tray by thecatalog

Row 3: Soleil Cowl Merino Wool and Cashmere Neckwarmer by TickledPinkKnits; Handy Tools Earrings by dobleele; Kinies Classic Goldenrod Bag by Kinies

Row 4: Be Wise Be Handy Vintage Owl Magnifying Glass Necklace by soradesigns; Golden Delicious Print by amandakindregan; Golden Yellow Baby Girl Felt Booties by sunflowerexpress

Doe-C-Doe — flickr Mondays!


So, we’re a little late with this week’s flickr Monday, but these pictures are so cute, we couldn’t wait another week.

We featured one of doe-c-doe’s prints in a Schmetsy a while back, but I am so glad I rediscovered her work on flickr today. I’m loving these photographs from her Small World collection.

Check her out on flickr, or on her blog, or at etsy.

Etsy Schmetsy: Etsysaurus Schmex!

This week’s Schmetsy pays tribute to a group that is somehow simultaneously terrifying and lovable: dinosaurs!




Row 1: The Kid’s Table Archival Fine Art Print by WildLifePrints; T-Rex Dinosaur Print by berkleyillustration; RAWR 2 Fine Art Print by UrbanPinkPhotography

Row 2: Jurassic Dinosaur Terrarium by terradctl; Dino Hunting – Dinosaur on Plaque by Jadesun; Hanging Pterodactyl Necklace by BrainsandBeauty

Row 3: Handmade Felted Brontosaurus by FeltedFriends; Ruzgar the Pterodactyl Wool Felt Plush Doll by nonesuchgarden; The First Thanksgiving Original Collage by unusualcards

Row 4: T.Rex Organic Maple Wood Teether by littlealouette; Dinoclasm Passport Case by Mikeatron for Tinymeat; Dinosaur Toy Necklace by pinkavenger

IKEA’s Hembakat är Bäst (Homemade is Best)

Ikea’s new cookbook, Hembakat är Bäst, has been all over in the blog world, for the past few days. But, if you haven’t had the pleasure of previewing it, it looks pretty rad. So far I haven’t been able to figure out how to purchase it (short of flying to Sweden, which while appealing, seems a bit absurd). The images are by Carl Kleiner and the styling was done by by Evelina Bratell.




TypograFriday: Tree of Codes Part 1

I heard Jonathan Safran Foer speak with Vendela Vida (yep, co-editor of my favorite magazine ever) the other night as part of the excellent series City Arts and Lectures. After talking lucidly at length about his nonfiction book on the ethical implications of meat, Eating Animals, Vida asked him about a new book he had just finished called Tree of Codes. She showed him a copy (which is one of only ten dummies of the work extant) and he couldn’t contain his curiosity; he hadn’t actually seen it yet.

He was fascinated by his own work for this reason: he didn’t write the words to this book, and its form is rather interesting. London upstart/art publishers Visual Editions reportedly came to him with this offer: “we can’t pay you, but on the other hand we’ll make any sort of book you can imagine.” Their second book, after their ambitious edition of Tristram Shandy, will be his reaction to this challenge (“It’s gonna have to be really interesting to make that worth it”). All the words were written by Bruno Schultz, in his classic collection Street of Crocodiles. What Safran Foer brought to the work was, well, scissors.

Inspired by FBI, wartime or totalitarian redaction of documents, and by Schultz’ own erasure — Safran Foer called the work an “erased text” and told a little bit of the fate of Schultz, who was spared death for a time during the Holocaust by painting murals for a Nazi officer that were subsequently obscured, revealed, and smuggled from Poland by the Mossad — Safran Foer clipped away words revealing a new text: Street of Crocodiles. Visual Editions found a printer willing and able to make it: the published book, incredibly, will be diecut with a different die for every page.

He described the process as something he expected to be fun but was in fact very frustrating. But, one excellent quote from the evening was something like “as time goes on I have less and less faith that I can write something good, but I have more and more faith in accidents.” The juxtapositions and phrases he found in the process are all creative accidents: they surprised him and were not what he would have come to with his own devices.

Needless to say, I’m thrilled about the book. It’s right up my alley. I am fascinated by redaction and erasure. I like diecuts quite a bit. And, not only does it conjure memories of Street of Crocodiles (which is great, distinctly textured, both as a collection and as a somewhat different film by the Brothers Quay — the entirety of which is in two clips after the jump) but of experimental writings I have loved.

Burroughs used cut-ups. Oulipo writers have some games that start with found texts or otherwise artificially limiting word selection to force the creative accident. I dig artists books. And my favorite artist book ever, A Humument, is a  similar project to this one. I first encountered A Humument when its pages were exhibited at the museum when I was a kid. I found an edition years later as if from a remembered dream, and have bought three or four copies since. Artist Tom Phillips painted and drew directly over pages of the Victorian novel A Human Document, leaving words joined by proximity or rivers of white space to make new prose-poems (and a sort-of narrative starring a hero named “toge” who can only appear by name when the original text speaks of togetherness) with the remaining words; for each subsequent edition he’s repainted some pages differently so that the overall text changes over time, eventually becoming a wholly different piece than the original.

More pics after the jump and the whole thing here.

Continue reading TypograFriday: Tree of Codes Part 1

FAMAPA-FLICKR MONDAYS!

Such lovely detail/texture shots by Famapa (not sure of the actual name). Brings back memories of Europe!

More of Famapa’s work here.

Typografriday: Lost World Fairs

The observant among you may have noticed that the type here at the ‘Agree is a little different. We’re dipping our toe in elegant typography using typekit, and we’re pleased as punch about it. If you don’t know much about using good type on the web yet, but want your site to look good (like ours does we hope, or like my brother’s blog which inspired us to take the plunge, or like thedieline) we definitely recommend it.

If you want to figure out how to make your site look unbelievably good, you should definitely head over to Jason Santa Maria’s site. He not only puts together some of the best examples of good web type, but he’s one of the clearest voices on explaining the new tools and finally, not coincidentally, one of the primary developers of those tools, including Typekit and the WOFF format.

His latest blog entry is a detailed behind-the-scenes of the making of the most fantastic typographic things on the web yet. Lost World’s Fairs. This was made to promote IE9′s support of WOFF (just when most of us were about seven years into considering IE dead). Santa Maria’s Moon one shows live type on a slant, shifted baselines and slant within a text box, overlapping text, text behind alpha masked objects and other things you thought the web couldn’t do. Naz Hamid‘s El Dorado has lovely overlapping transparent type, shifted letter by letter. (Yeah that’s all live css type… Crazy right?) And Frank T Chimero‘s Atlantis one is particularly awesome, combining excellent use of extended slab Hellenic and Simonson’s Avenir-contender Proxima Nova plus extended scrolling-as-narrative movement a la the best webcomic I can remember, When I am King.

Anyway don’t delay: go look at the Lost World’s Fairs right now. And if you’re curious for more, all of the contributors wrote about the experience: Jason, Frank, Naz, Trent, and Dave

Etsy Schmetsy: Tweeder

Autumn is upon us (mind you, in San Francisco that mostly means delightfully summer days, but I digress) and in New York it’s Fashion Week. Time to put away summer’s lightweight casuals and pull out the warmer, dressier heavy hitters. I am talking about woolen tweed, which in the world of handmade crafts has been reinvented from stuffily professorial – the stuff of John Hodgman and Rupert Giles – to adorable and flirty.




Row One  : :  Wool cloche by lizarietz : :  The Delivery Pack by Sketchbook : :  Deer brooch by shopJoliette

Row Two  : :  corduroy and tweed reversible spats by merrybe : :  wool/cashmere/silk cowl by breadandroses2 : :   “the roaring fire” upcycled pillow by emmadear

Row Three  : :  Bon Bon and Belchick (tweed woodland squirrels in love) by sleepyking : :  upcycled scarf by HTandH : : wool wrap coat by 13threads

Row Four  : :  Recycled suits messenger bag by RumahKampung : :  Handmade Journal by Highland Books : :  travel cape by daintythings

Abby Powell-Flickr Mondays!

Lovely how something so simple can look so beautiful.

Abby Powell’s flickr site here.
Abby’s blog here.

Typografriday: Calligraffiti

We’ve mentioned Niels “Shoe” Meulman before, but in case you hadn’t looked closer at his Calligraffiti pieces, I wanted to show a few more. I’m not generally even a big fan of graffiti (and nazis and ed hardy have both seriously threatened my love for fraktur) but his hybrid of a loose blackletter and the drips and attitude of grafitti is inspired and beautiful.

shoe_shoe

shoe_destroyed

shoe_diffrent

shoe_spitting

Oh and he makes fancy big silk Unruly scarves too, with lovely color combinations and hidden subversive texts (e.g. “Society Fools,” shown on the model). I’m tempted to buy one but maybe just because it comes with a signed copy of his book.

unruly_societyfoolshot

unruly_2scarves
Although he is fierce at defending his turf, Shoe isn’t the only writer at this intersection. I’ve recently discovered Luca Barcellona, whose lettering work is fantastic, and all the better when he mixes it up with spraypaint on a wall. Here’s a flickr set full of crossover work with his “Rebel Ink” crew.

rebel_wall1

rebel_wall2 copy

Oh and, happy typografriday!

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