Etsy Schmesty: A Few Words

Sometimes you need a few inspiring words, and Keep Calm and Carry On, simply won’t cut it. Hopefully one of these prints will do the trick!



Row 1: pleasebestill; dearcolleen; SweetDee
Row 2: AlisaBobzien; niftyswank; MaryKateMcDevitt
Row 3: rawartletterpress; dazeychic; hijirik

In Radiolab We Trust


I love Radiolab. I also love gocco. So the new print series benefiting Radiolab, In Radiolab We Trust, is right up my alley. The series, curated by Jez Burrows, includes prints from Always With Honor, Jim Datz, Jessica Hische, Lab Partners, and Richard Perez. Grab your copy from the edition of 100 here.

via Bang Back

Let’s Swap!


Let’s Swap — a new project from Brooklyn-based hyperakt — is an awesome site that enables artists to swap their art for the featured print. The print that is currently available is the Good Morning/Good Night from Dolce Press.  It is full of awesomeness — letterpress, glow in the dark and an upbeat message. If you’ve got something to trade, go submit your swap and see if you get chosen, otherwise the print can be purchased from Dolce Press’s shop.

UPDATE: Our CMYHey Triangle print was chosen by Dolce Press as a swap. You can go vote for us to put us in the running to maybe be a featured swap in the future!

Levi’s Workshop: Print on Valencia

San Francisco has a super special new thing going on this summer. Levi’s Workshop/Print (a two-month pop-up community letterpress/silkscreen printshop) has opened in the Mission. I went to the opening night and stopped in again on Saturday, talked a bit with a few of the staff, and can’t stop thinking about how great it’s going to be.

The Workshops are places for creation, inspiration, and collaboration. We’re excited to bring the first of these experiences to life right in our own backyard. Located in San Francisco’s iconic Mission District (home to one of the first Levi’s® factories), we’ve opened up a community print shop. During July and August we’ll be hard at work teaching classes on classic letterpress machinery, screenprinting designs, setting type, and getting our hands dirty.

The facade: I love that they whitewashed and reclaimed the existing Biltmore Laundry sign with its classic Americana shape (see a great slideshow here) and mostly am a fan of the exhaustive list of types of workers (including blogger) on the facade, paid off with the Holzer Truisms-esque neon sign “Everyone’s Work is Equally Important.” But I am disappointed that they put it up in a handwriting font and not either traditionally handlettered or, if it has to be type, at least use the much more well-done Pettibon/McFetteridge-esque handlettering type used all over the site’s css.

levis_facade

levi_facade_before

My analysis: So normally I’d have a fair amount of skepticism for such a display of big-company-throwing-money-at-coolness, but there’s many ways that this is distinct from your average marketing exercise from the likes of Nike.

  1. Levi’s is a San Francisco company; their original plant was operating at 14th and Valencia until 2002. Plus of course, jeans were worker’s attire before becoming the greatest American sartorial export, making both the location/community and the “work” theme are not just genuine but resonant.
  2. Their choices of collaborators are not just buzz names (like Sagmeister, Fairey, Aaron Rose) but community-local (The Women’s Building, SoEx, Mother Jones, Mission Grafica) and public-pedagogical innovators (Alice Waters, Craig Newmark, 826) if not some combination of the three. It’s a group that is both nigh-unimpeachable and impressively progressive.
  3. The overall feel is much more public, conversational, accessible, educational and positive than it is branded-marketing-pushy. Which I hope is a sign of changing attitudes towards marketing in general.
  4. In an era of “new media” being everyone’s buzzword, it’s heartening to see this embrace of old media, of “getting one’s hands dirty.” Though no doubt twitter, facebook, blogs (not to mention jumbotrons) will amplify the message, the media in question isn’t apps and Mafia Wars but real ink, screens and presses — newspapers, broadsheets, posters, books, public propaganda. Both letterpress and arts education are under constant threat of disappearance and this public celebration is welcome. It’s easy to see how this will translate into other workshops: photography and music have both gone digital as surely as printing, and a space for darkrooms with, say Jonathan Kozol or for 8-track masters with Jack White is a beautiful idea.

I have no reservations saying that this workshop is a fantastic thing, and I’m hoping that it becomes the textbook example of corporate social responsibility, (cultural edition). I am excited about the next two months and only sad that it won’t become a permanent fixture of the Valencia corridor. After August, they’ll close back down, some version of the Slanted Door will move back in, and a new Levi’s workshop centered around photography will open in New York for two months.

levi_program

Some of the programs I’m particularly interested in after the jump.

Continue reading Levi’s Workshop: Print on Valencia

show posters

Three of the four experts are going to see the Decemberists play tonight at the newly-restored and reopened, historic Fox Theater in Oakland. Since I’m a big fan of silkscreen, gig posters and the Decemberists, here is a collection of some of their beautiful show posters.

smallstakes_1

heroandsound

aestheticapparatus_1

strawberryluna

Even more posters, and all the poster credits, after the jump.

Continue reading show posters

New Work from Noah Dasho

Swallows_crop2

Swallows_crop

Noah Dasho just sent over some images of a beautiful new etching he just finished called Conversations. It is a 12″ x 16″ two-plate etching (softground, aquatint, spitbite) with added watercolor.

View some of Noah’s older work after the jump.

Continue reading New Work from Noah Dasho